APRIL 22 - Earth Day

APRIL 22 - Earth Day

Earth Day is celebrated in the US on April 22 and is a day designed to inspire awareness and appreciation for the Earth's environment. It was founded by U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson (D-Wisconsin) as an environmental teach-in in 1970, and is celebrated in many countries every year. This date is Spring in the Northern Hemisphere and Autumn in the Southern Hemisphere.

The United Nations celebrates an Earth Day each year on the March equinox, which is often March 20, a tradition which was founded by peace activist John McConnell in 1969.

History of the April 22 Day

Gaylord Nelson's announcement

In September 1969 at a conference in Seattle, Washington, U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin announced that in spring 1970 there would be a nationwide grassroots demonstration about the environment on the 100th anniversary of Lenin's birth. Senator Nelson first proposed the nationwide environmental protest to thrust the environment onto the national agenda.” "It was a gamble," he recalled, "but it worked."

Earth Week

Many cities extend the schedule of Earth Day observance events to be an entire week, usually starting on April 16, and ending on Earth Day, April 22. These events are designed to encourage environmentally aware behaviors, including increased recycling, improved energy-efficiency, and reduction in disposable items.

April 22 continues to be the date of the Annual Iowahawk "Virtual Cruise". Attended by millions worldwide.

Criticisms of Earth Day

Some environmentalists have become critical of Earth Day, particularly those in the bright green environmentalism camp. They charge that Earth Day has come to symbolize the marginalization of environmental sustainability, and that the celebration itself has outlived its usefulness.

A May 5, 2009 editorial in The Washington Times compared Arbor Day to Earth Day, claiming that Arbor Day was a happy, non-political celebration of trees, whereas Earth Day was a pessimistic, political ideology that portrayed humans in a negative light.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia