Clay Casting Project - Harvest Wreath
Harvest Wreath
Clay Casting Project
                                         
Materials Needed:

1 Rycraft cookie stamp or craft stamp each:
         
##007 - Cherries
          #008 - Pear
          #014 - Apple    OR    #1019 - Apple
         #015 - Grapes     OR    #1027 - Grapes
Clay - we recommend Creative Paperclay® which is non-toxic and air dries to a paintable pure white
3-4 clay castings* each:
          #007 - Cherries
          #008 - Pear
          #014 - Apple    OR    #1019 - Apple
          #015 - Grapes    OR    #1027 - Grapes   (see Basic Clay Casting Instructions)
2" round cookie cutter
Sandpaper or emery board
Acrylic primer
Acrylic paints: dark terra cotta, light terra cotta
Sponge brush, sponge, or piece of foam
Pre-made wreath, or make your own from leaves (from the local craft store)
Spray polyurethane varnish (optional)
Copper wire (looked better than floral wire for our wreath)
Hot glue

*Note:  Alternately, the casting for this project may be made from paper instead of clay (see Basic Paper Casting Instructions). The choice is yours.

Note: You can substitute Import design #1019 - Apple for Heirloom design #014 (pictured).
          
You can substitute Import design #1027 - Grapes for Heirloom design #015 (pictured).

           
 
Instructions:

1.  While clay is still wet, cut out castings with the biscuit cookie cutter.
2.  Follow the general instructions for adding holes in the castings (for the copper wire). Let casting dry.
Note:  Castings may be attached without wires, using hot glue on the backs of the castings to affix them to the leaves. If you are planning to do this, OMIT THIS STEP.
3.  Sand rough or uneven areas smooth.
4.  Apply a coat of primer to both sides of castings and let dry.
5.  Paint both sides of castings with 2 coats of the dark terra cotta paint, and let dry after each coat.
6.  Using the dry brush method (see Techniques for Special Effects), highlight castings with light terra cotta paint. Note: The foam will give the paint a soft, sponge-like look. If you don't like the results, just let it dry and repaint.
7.  Optional: If the wreath is going to hang outside, spray the castings with polyurethane varnish on both sides to seal them against the weather.
8.  Cut a length of copper wire to attach each casting to the wreath (length depends on the thickness of the wreath). Thread the wire through the hole, and gently twist the wire 2 or 3 times.
9.  Position the castings before gluing them to the wreath - this will help you avoid repositioning after the glue has set. Apply hot glue to the ends of the wire, and carefully poke them into the wreath. Hold in position until glue dries.

And don't forget the matching cookies!

 
 
Above left: Cookies baked by Robin Rycraft. Photograph by Paperworks, Corvallis, OR.
Above right:  Cookies decorated by and photographs courtesy of GooseHill Farms.



This clay casting project is featured along with dozens of others
in our book The Art of Clay Casting, which includes basic paper casting
instructions, techniques for special effects, and a glossary of terms.



Wreath project designed and created by Sue Moore. Photography by Paperworks, Corvallis, OR